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Cineflix Rights Closes Host of Deals in CEE & Greece


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Ahead of NATPE Budapest, Cineflix Rights has signed multiple deals that will see its scripted and factual content air on broadcasters throughout Central and Eastern Europe and Greece.

On the scripted side, Tanweer bought all three seasons of Marcella (produced by Buccaneer Media for ITV and Netflix) for ERT in Greece. Disney+ took season one of Coroner (produced by Muse Entertainment, Back Alley Films and Cineflix Studios for CBC) for its platforms in the Balkans and Bulgaria.

Deals were also signed for a variety of true-crime titles such as John Wayne Gacy: Killer Clown’s Revenge (from Hoff Productions for Reelz), Battle of Alcatraz (from Hoff Productions for Reelz) and Killer Cases (from Law&Crime Productions for True Crime Network). In the Czech Republic, TV JOJ picked up John Wayne Gacy: Killer Clown’s Revenge, while FTV Prima acquired Battle of Alcatraz. AMCNI also bought Battle of Alcatraz for Spektrum channel in Central Europe. Season two of Killer Cases was sold to AETN in Poland.

Also in Poland, Kino acquired Secret Nazi Expeditions (produced by Go Button Media for Super Channel) for its Stopklatka channel and Smart Home Nation (produced by Efran Films for FYI and Crackle) for Zoom TV.

Lucy Rawson, VP of sales in Africa, CEE, the Middle East and the Southern Mediterranean at Cineflix Rights, said, “I’m delighted to be closing these deals for some of our long-running scripted shows and recently acquired factual content with our partners in the region. I’m really looking forward to returning to NATPE Budapest in person with a strong slate of new content to launch to buyers at the market.”








About Jamie Stalcup

Jamie Stalcup is the associate editor of World Screen. She can be reached at jstalcup@worldscreen.com.

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