Wednesday, September 19, 2018
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Sky Vision’s Great Pottery Throw Down Set for Danish Version


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Sky Vision has sold the format rights for The Great Pottery Throw Down to TV2 in Denmark.

The 8×60-minute local treatment of the format, originally from Love Productions (The Great British Bake Off), is set to air on TV2 in 2019. The Danish adaptation will be produced by Strong Productions. The Great Pottery Throw Down is a factual-entertainment competition series that embarks on a national search for the best amateur pottery talent. The TV2 judging panel will include the contemporary ceramist master Michael Geersten, who exhibits at the Metropolitan in New York.

Andrea Zarzecki, the senior sales manager at Sky Vision, said, “Ceramics and pottery are having a renaissance at the moment, so it’s the perfect time to involve viewers in such a creative and compelling show. We’re excited that it has found a home at TV2 and I’m sure viewers will be charmed by this engaging format.”

Anette Romer, the head of acquisitions and formats for TV2 acquisitions, Denmark, added, “We think that the idea of craftsmanship will connect very well with the Danish audience and it also falls into the long and glorious tradition of Danish design where arts and crafts are intertwined and where there is something for everyone. The pottery format will add a new and vibrant feel to the schedule.”

Richard McKerrow, co-founder of Love Productions, commented, “We’re extremely proud of The Great Pottery Throw Down, an original format and a show that quickly captured viewers’ imaginations in the U.K., and we look forward to seeing the creations of our first group of Danish potters.”








About Sara Alessi

Sara Alessi is the associate editor of World Screen. She can be reached at salessi@worldscreen.com.

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